Two days ago I couldn’t reissue my passport after getting my renewed diploma and car title because the goddamn county clerk wasn’t taking appointments, “because of COVID”. (Numbers have been dropping a lot over the last few weeks. I think that office just didn’t want to do their job, as almost every other local, state, and federal office was up and running!)

I went to my local Walgreens to get a photo taken … but the machine was down. The cashier said Walmart’s photo center was open and taking them. So I went.

It was the kid’s first time taking the photo, but the state department’s photo check thing said my photo checked out. With that, I went to the local post office, paid for tracking, and submitted my renewal.

Now to wait for the reissued passport … or a letter stating my photo didn’t qualify. 🤣

A blank outline of a passport card.

In the meantime, I have updated my Resources page to include information on the passport card, for trans people living in jurisdictions where it’s hard or expensive for them to update their birth certificate and/or state photo ID (or in Tennessee, the lone state now that prohibits trans people from updating their birth records at all to reflect their gender identity). A cheaper alternative to passport books for people who frequently travel by land or sea to other parts of North America, the passport card (which is the same size as most state photo IDs) can be used as an alternative to other forms of ID when citizenship, proof of identity, etc is required. Biden has declared we no longer need a doctor’s or therapist’s letter detailing “treatment” for gender dysphoria, so for $65 new (or $30 renewed) you’ll get a photo ID showing your gender identity, without fear or hassle from the courts. (You still need a court document showing that you can legally go by your prefered name, sadly. You would think with a social security number you could go by any alias or name, but due to “fraud prevention” this won’t be.) This card can also help you update your Social Security records and other documents (depending on what your local state and jurisdiction require and allow, and whatever private services you use like insurance) as a form of “proof” of your transition, if required.

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